Detox?
26 January, 2013

Detox Advice

Is detoxing necessary? For those of us who live a life of unimpaired purity,
drinking nothing but water and eating mainly fruit and vegetables on a daily
basis, no it isn’t.

For those of us who avoid alcohol, get plenty of exercise and sleep, and eat
mainly unprocessed and organic foods, made at home and eaten in a relaxed
manner, it probably isn’t too important either.

For those of us living in the real world, where tea, coffee, alcohol and
processed foods of one sort or another feature regularly in lives that often run
short on sleep and high on stress, with exercise being a good intention and
home-made meals a luxury, detox should definitely be on the agenda.

The body is able to detoxify itself very efficiently, but every system has its
limits – put in enough bad food and drink, and things will slow down.

Symptoms could be poor bowel function, lack of energy, bad skin, puffy eyes,
headaches, and so on.

To help your body get back on top of the load of toxins it has to deal with, start
by spending a week or so drinking 2 litres of still water daily, avoiding tea,
coffee and fizzy drinks, and eating less refined, processed foods and more
fresh fruit and vegetables.

If your bowel isn’t moving every day, take a combination of linseed and senna
or similar remedies until it is – toxins can’t be removed from the body if the
exit routes are blocked…

Then introduce liver-supportive herbs such as Milk Thistle, Cynara and Dandelion, to improve
fat metabolism and break down toxins more efficiently. Kidney-supportive herbs such as
Golden Rod (Solidago) will also be helpful, especially if you have a tendency to retain fluid.
These should be used for up to a month, depending on how toxin-heavy you consider your
normal lifestyle to be.

Other helpful supplements are nettles, which purify the bloodstream (taken them as tea or tincture); 
kelp, which boosts metabolism and assists the body in removing heavy metals; and 
Ginkgo biloba, which supports the circulation and gets oxygen to any poorly nourished corners of the body.

Shopping List
Cut Out: red meat, burgers, fried food, wheat, refined sugar, dairy products,
alcohol, coffee, tea, biscuits, cakes, chocolate and sweets
Include: fresh fruit and vegetables, chickpeas, adzuki beans, butter beans,
kidney beans, green or red lentils, tofu, wheat-free pasta, rice cakes,
oatcakes, corn cakes, humus, dairy-free milk, dairy-free yoghurt and cheese,
coffee substitutes such as Bambu, herb teas, dried fruit, nuts and seeds

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