Shipley Health Store Guide to Blending Essential Oils
06 June, 2017

1. Select appropriate carrier oil. The most popular and commonly used is sweet almond oil – be careful if you are intolerant of almonds!

  • Jojoba – a rich oil good for all skin types and can be used to condition hair too
  • Wheat germ – good for dry and mature skin. Processing should mean that it is wheat free but treat it as you would any other product made in the same location as other wheat products
  • Grapeseed – a good alternative to sweet almond as it is light and fragrance free
  • Sunflower - a slightly heavier oil than sweet almond some use it for massage
  • Avocado – a rich oil quite heavy again good for dry skin
  • Evening Primrose – a popular oil for skin

2. Have a mixing bolted for your blend

3. Have droppers so you don’t have direct contact with the oils

4. Cotton balls to try out combinations on

5. Pen and paper or computer to notes your attempts on. There is nothing more frustrating than making a fabulous new scent and then not being able to duplicate it!

6. Decide on bottle or container to put your blend in

7. What combination of oils do you want to use?

8. What strength of oil do you want – which relates to how and who you  are using it for

1% strength use for children up to 5 years

2% strength for facial treatment

3% strength for body massage

5% strength for specific application

Amount of base oil

     

Base Oil

10ml

25ml

50ml

100ml

 

Total number

of drops of

Essential oils

 

1% strength

2

5

10

20

2% strength

4

10

20

40

3% strength

6

15

30

60

5% strength

10

25

50

100

 


Citrus Oils for example are light and fresh but do not last for longThe amount of oil put into a blend depends on its strength and your preference.

Oils such as Neroli, Geranium Clary Sage, Rosemary and ginger endure a longer time

Strong oils are ones such as Tea tree, Ylang-Ylang, Jasmine and Chamomile

You may wish to blend top, middle and base notes to give yourself a balanced blend.

Top notes as you may expect are the initial aromas you notice, they tend not to last so long. Typically oils from citrus fruits fall into this category

Middle motes are the core of your blend and last longer and perhaps up to several hours, examples include geranium and clary sage.

Base notes are the stronger aromas of which you will need less; oils like cedar wood, patchouli or ylang-ylang. Some of these may last up to a day

9. Initially try out some oils on cotton balls leave them over 24 hours so you see how they perform over a period of time.

10. Once you are happy use the dropper to put your oils into the mixing bottle along with the carrier oil. Shake the bottle after each oil has been added to give it a chance to blend with the carrier and other oils.

11. Put the completed blend into the bottle you will use it from

12. ENJOY!!

 

STORAGE

Oils are best stored in a cool, dark place

Most will last approximately two years although citrus oils generally last

Oils will last longer if kept in the fridge i.e. 2 -4 years.

Blends tend to last up to 6 months and 12 months in the fridge.

In my experience oils last much longer than this even outside the fridge.

If you do go for the fridge option keep them separate from food and clearly labelled!!

 

SAFETY GUIDELINES

These oils are toxic and are best avoided

Pennyroyal, Sage, Tansy, Thuja, Wintergreen, and Wormwood

Oils to be avoided in pregnancy and while breastfeeding:

Aniseed, Basil, Camphor, Cinnamon, Fennel, Hyssop, Nutmeg, Pennyroyal, Sage, Tansy, Tarragon, Thuja and Wintergreen

Oils that can irritate the skin

Basil, Cinnamon, Clove, Fennel, Eucalyptus, Oregano, Peppermint, Rosemary, Thyme

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